Previous Productions

Click on images to view the full version

Post Horn Gallop
by Derek Benfield
In the ancestral home of Lord and Lady Elrood, a nerve-shattered Chester Dreadnought is menaced by his old enemies Capone and Wedgwood. Intent on stealing a valuable painting mayhem ensues as Chester tries to convince the household that there are indeed two criminals in the castle who want the “lady over the fireplace”. Meanwhile, in the flower beds Lord Elrood lurks with his shotgun ready to repel attacks by the butcher’s boy, the postman and anyone else unfortunate enough to come within his sight.

Souvenir
by Stephen Temperley
In a Greenwich Village supper club in 1964, Cosmé McMoon flashes back to the musical career of Florence Foster Jenkins, a wealthy socialite with a famously uncertain sense of pitch and key. In 1932, she met mediocre Cosmé, and the two teamed up for 12 years in the hope of achieving success. This bizarre partnership yielded a myriad of off-key recitals that became the talk of New York and earned Florence cultish fame.

Quartet
by Ronald Harwood
In the idyllic countryside Cecily, Reggie and Wilfred reside in a home for retired opera singers. Arriving unexpectedly, Jean, who had a very short lived marriage to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium as she announces she has arrived to stay. Each year, on the tenth of October, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday, but Jean refuses to take part thus causing tension and the re-emerging of old wounds.

Dracula
Original text by Bram Stoker
Play by Robert Smyth and Kerry Meads
Robert Smyth and Kerry Meads wrote this version of Dracula back in the 1980’s and it was first performed in San Diego at Lambs Players Theatre. Taking the original Bram Stoker text and adding in a chorus of narrators, the story loses nothing of the chill of this dramatic re-enactment of evil vs good in Victorian England. The struggle plumbs the depths of each person’s strengths and weaknesses as they seek to overcome a growing malevolence that none have encountered before.

West Moon Street
by Rob Urbinati
When a mysterious palm reader predicts that Lord Arthur Savile will commit a murder, the proper English gentleman believes it is his duty to get this killing business over with before he marries Sybil Merton. But his education has not provided him with the required skills, and a hilarious series of mishaps ensues as he sets about finding a victim. West Moon Street is based on the short story by Oscar Wilde, Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime.

Shakespeare’s Will
by Vern Thiessen
This one-woman tour-de-force profiles the life of Shakespeare’s wife, Anne Hathaway. Building on original findings about the life of Anne, the play explores the complex relationship she and the famous bard shared as husband and wife. This moving production takes the audience on a joyous and harrowing ride into the life of this remarkable woman.

Streuth!
by Michael Green
For our first Christmas/New Year show we staged a collection of comedy sketches and the one-act play Streuth!  Part of a selection of four one act plays dealing with the mishaps of amateur theatre, Streuth! portrays the mayhem on stage as the local drama society tries to mount a murder mystery.

Enchanted April
by Matthew Barber
When two frustrated London housewives decide to rent a villa in Italy for a holiday away from their bleak marriages, they recruit two very different English women to share the cost and the experience. There, among the wisteria blossoms and Mediterranean sunshine, all four bloom again,rediscovering themselves in ways that they never thought possible.

Toad of Toad Hall by A.A. Milne based on Kenneth Graham’s The Wind in the Willows.

Toad of Toad Hall is a story of friendship and loyalty found in the English woods of yesteryear. Centered around the incorrigible Toad and his ‘crazes’, we are granted a special look into his friendships with Rat, Mole and Badger, and the chance to experience his mis-adventures! Along with a collection of humans and some wayward animals from the Wildwood, we have a tale full of surprises and fun.

Blithe Spirit by Noel Coward

Fussy, cantakerous novelist Charles Condomine has re-married but is haunted by the ghost of his late first wife, the clever and insistent Elvira. Elvira is called up by a visiting “happy medium”, one Madame Arcati. As the worldly and un-wordly personalities clash, Charles’ current wife Ruth is accidentally killed, “passes over”, joins Elvira and the two “blithe spirits” haunt the hapless Charles into perpetuity.

Arsenic and Old Lace
by Joseph Kesselring
This classic work of theatre focuses on the Brewster family, descended from the “Mayflower,” but now mainly composed of mentally unstable individuals! Set in Brooklyn, NY, the hero, Mortimer Brewster, is a drama critic who must deal with his crazy, homicidal family, the local police and his fiance, who he has just asked to marry him.

The Dresser by Ronald Harwood

The year is 1942 and while bombs rain down from the Heavens and the lights are going out all over Britain and Europe, a small touring theatre company continues to perform in the English provinces. Despite the ravages of World War II and the fact that most young and able-bodied actors are in uniform, ‘Sir’, the actor-manager of the troupe, is determined that the show ‘must go on’. And that show just happens to be Shakespeare’s “King Lear”. Not only is this great tragedy played out on their stage, shades of it are also enacted in our drama as we see Sir struggling to maintain his troupe and himself against great odds.

Hay Fever by Noel Coward

Set in an English country house in the 1920s, Hay Fever deals with the four eccentric members of the Bliss family and their outlandish behaviour when they each invite a guest to spend the weekend. The self-centred behaviour of the hosts finally drives their guests to flee while the Blisses are so engaged in a family row that they do not notice their guests’ furtive departure.

The Importance of Being Earnest
by Oscar Wilde
First performed on 14 February 1895 at the St James’s Theatre in London, The Importance of Being Earnest is a farcical comedy in which the protagonists maintain fictitious personæ to escape burdensome social obligations. Working within the social conventions of late Victorian London, the play’s major themes are the triviality with which it treats institutions as serious as marriage, and the resulting satire of Victorian ways. This is Wilde’s most famous play.

-->